Weave forge tie prepare

robeGod’s word is alive. It will speak directly to you, your situation, your mess. I’ve witnessed it personally. Listen.

I woke up this morning under my not-that-uncommon panic, that scratchy dusty threadbare unwanted blanket. Nothing specific, just a general feeling of I’m-not-enough-to-do-all-that-needs-to-be-done. I found solace in a surprising place, a parable.

In Luke 15, Jesus gives us the story of the prodigal son to describe his father’s limitless love for us. It’s so rich in hope, mercy, and grace. I love it; it is foundational to my understanding of God’s love despite my sin. Here’s what I heard today from this much-read, much-studied word. Let’s look at the scripture first:

“But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and was filled with compassion for him; he ran to his son, threw his arms around him and kissed him.

“The son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’

“But the father said to his servants, ‘Quick! Bring the best robe and put it on him. Put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. Bring the fattened calf and kill it. Let’s have a feast and celebrate. For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’ So they began to celebrate.

This is what occurred to me today. The wayward son did not weave the robe, or forge the ring, or tie the sandals, or prepare the feast. That was the work of God. It was not requested, expected, or deserved. But it was given, lavishly, at no cost!

My peace comes not from my own efforts, but from trust in God’s provision, no — more than that — his limitless blessings. With this trust, I am able to let go of my white-knuckle grip on perfection, the relentless pursuit of doing more, achieving more.

Trust in God. He loves you and wants his best for you. It’s more than you can imagine and you needn’t weave, forge, tie, or prepare. He’s got you covered. Praise God!

 

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About Tony Schmitz

Tony Schmitz received his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Temple University in 1993, his MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida in 1996, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida in 1999. He is a mechanical engineering professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
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