A solitary place

Luke 8 describes the story of the man from Genaseres and his encounter with Jesus. Like many (like me, like you?), this encounter radically changed his life.

The Gerasenes man, let’s call him G, had many demons, so many that they called themselves Legion. Do you have demons? Lust, pride, bitterness, envy, fear, rebellion, impatience, shame? Some of mine appear in that hit parade. G, full of demons, did the best thing possible. He confronted Jesus. “What do you want with me?” (Verse 28)

You need to read the story for yourself (start at verse 26), but I want to point you to one verse in particular. Luke 8:29 says:

For Jesus had commanded the impure spirit to come out of the man. Many times it had seized him, and though he was chained hand and foot and kept under guard, he had broken his chains and had been driven by the demon into solitary places.

Let’s take a closer look. To protect himself and others, he was bound. He was even guarded. It was someone’s job to watch over him and stop his destructive behavior (parents/teenagers anyone?). Because of his demon’s, though, he consistently broke away and, when he broke away, he was driven from those who would care for him to a “solitary place”.

Can you find yourself in this? I certainly can. When I allow my demons to drive the Tony car, I drive off the road. Then off a cliff. Exploding spectacularly on the way down. My highlight reel has more crashes than a Sean Connery Bond film. If I look carefully, I can find two constants in my various failures: 1. I run from those who care for me (including God); and 2. I am convinced that I am alone.

If you have broken away and driven your car off the road, let me assure you of two fundamental truths. 1. You are not alone. 2. God still loves you.

Cry out to him right now. “What do you want with me, Jesus?” He will answer and he is waiting to heal you.

Advertisements

About Tony Schmitz

Tony Schmitz received his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Temple University in 1993, his MS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida in 1996, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida in 1999. He is a mechanical engineering professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
This entry was posted in Growth and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s